Now at Wally’s Wine & Cheese in Los Angeles

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We’re so excited to be on the shelves at Wally’s Wine & Cheese in LA (Westwood & Beverly Hills)!

Located at:

// 2107 Westwood Blvd, Los Angeles, CA. 90025
// 447 N. Canon Drive Beverly Hills, CA 90210

Now at Oakville Grocery in Napa & Sonoma Valley

We LOVE Oakville Grocery in California (Napa & Sonoma Valleys) and are so excited that the jam and mustard is on their shelves. Did you know they’re the oldest operating grocery store in California? It’s one of our fave places to get groceries & sammies north of SF. Go say hi and get your Anarchy fix.

Oakville-Grocery-Inside

Beer Mustard featured on Hale & Hearty Soup’s new Signature Sandwich!

Beer_Mustard-overheadWe’re really excited that our Beer Mustard will be on Hale & Hearty Soup’s new Signature Sandwich! We’ll be sandwiched along with our friends Murray’s cheddar, some sweet & spicy pickles, all on our favorite City Bakery pretzel croissant. Sounds delicious! And it’s finally picnic season.

They’ll be available starting this Monday (4/25) at:

// 75 Ninth Ave (in Chelsea Market)
// 745 7th Ave (at 49th St)
// 110 Maiden Lane (at Pine St)
// 350 Hudson St (in the West Village)

Monday is a perfect day to eat a sandwich. The Anarchy crew will be heading over to 110 Maiden Lane in the Financial District at lunchtime, come say hi.

Get your mustard on: it’s BBQ + picnic season

Mustard is a stellar condiment year-round, but there’s something about picnics and BBQs that begs for that spicy, salty, vinegary taste. You can put it on anything (try dipping fresh strawberries in the beer mustard), but it adds such great texture and flavor to summer foods, whether on a burger or grilled zucchini or stirred into potato salad or deviled eggs.

I love all my mustard children; the spicy, malty Beer Mustard, the tarragon and garlic-fresh Herb Mustard, and the wild child Umami Shiso Fine. You can find all three for sale at the Bedford Cheese Shop in Gramercy Park, Manhattan (67 Irving Pl, New York, NY) or in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (229 Bedford Ave, Brooklyn, NY). I even just dropped off a super special small batch flavor: hot peach honey mustard! Not very sweet, yes spicy, and yes peachy with the mouth pleasing warmth of local honey — right now, it’s my favorite mustard.

If you live faraway or are a lazy local, mouth.com has them for sale online, plus they come in a super cool box (http://www.mouth.com/products/umami-shiso-mustard).

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Want to cook with mustard? These are some recipes I like:

Saveur’s list of mustard recipes: http://www.saveur.com/article/Kitchen/One-Ingredient-Many-Ways-Mustard

Salmon with a whole grain mustard crust: http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/roast-salmon-with-whole-grain-mustard-crust

Celery root salad with red peppers & mustard: http://noteatingoutinny.com/2011/10/02/creamy-celery-root-salad-with-red-peppers-and-mustard/

Cathy made these for a picnic we had last summer and they were fantastic! Cast iron roast chicken salad with chicken fat aioli sandwiches: http://noteatingoutinny.com/2014/06/05/cast-iron-roasted-chicken-salad-with-chicken-fat-aioli-sandwiches/

Roasted Spiced Lamb Ribs With Whole Grain Mustard Sauce: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2014/12/roasted-spiced-lamb-ribs-whole-grain-mustard-sauce-recipe.html

Mustard roasted potatoes: http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2008/11/mustard-roasted-potatoes/

Salted Caramel Apple Butter: Recipe + Pairings

It’s officially fall, and that means we release our seasonal Salted Caramel Apple Butter. How do we make it?

First, we prep apples that we get from our friends at Mead Farm in the Hudson Valley. We cook them in a touch of water until they’re soft and buttery.

Next, we take dry organic, fair trade sugar and slowly melt it in a pan, adding the dry sugar slowly and stirring until it’s a golden caramel. We deglaze with the softened apples and add the spices and sea salt. Then we cook it until the flavors blend and the texture is smooth and buttery perfection. Voila!

Then we eat it! I love to eat it on toast, but also with pork chops, or in a grilled cheese with either PRAIRIE BREEZE CHEDDAR  or my personal favorite, CABOT CREAMERY CABOT CLOTHBOUND CHEDDAR.

It’s also great on a cheese plate. I recommend going to Murray’s Cheese (they ship too, so never fear non-New Yorkers) and creating a master fall cheese plate with American-made cheeses: start with the creamy, oozy, floral 2014 American Cheese Society winner CELLARS AT JASPER HILL HARBISON, a gruyere from Wisconsin ROTH KASE GRAND CRU GRUYERE SURCHOIX, a rad cheddar such as 5 SPOKE CREAMERY TUMBLEWEED, a buttery classic American blue such as NORTH HENDREN CHEESE COOPERATIVE BLACK RIVER BLUE, and a wild, pungent, stinky tomme such as CATO CORNER FARM’s HOOLIGAN. Dress the plate with some smoked almonds, dried cranberries, crusty bread bites and Castleton Crackers from Vermont (I recommend the Maple and the Rye), fill everyone’s glasses with hard cider, and voila! A fall cheese plate that will knock your socks off.

The Manhattan Jam: Sour Cherry Preserves Recipe

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Photo by Michael Harlan Turkell, from my cookbook “Jam On”

Because it’s cherry season, I’m posting one of my favorite recipes! Enjoy!

The Manhattan Jam // Sour Cherry Preserves    

A Manhattan cocktail in a jar! Sour cherries float in a red glow of rye whiskey, vermouth, orange and bitters

This recipe is an homage to my maternal grandparents, who only drank Manhattans and always traveled with a beautiful portable bar set. Classy.

Cherries are beloved in cultures all over the world, and are preserved from Eastern Europe to Iran. Sour cherries in particular are rich in healthy antioxidants, as well as high in vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals. They’re also one of the few foods to contain natural melatonin, which is a mood enhancer and sleep aid. Red Montmorency or Morello black sour cherries are my favorite. Montmorency have a slight almond flavor that’s wonderful in this preserve, and Morello black sour cherries have a delightful dark red color.

To remove the pits, the best tool is a snocciolatore (pronounced snotch-ol-atory) or cherry pitter (shown in the photo above). It will make the job much easier. If you don’t want to purchase a cherry pitter, then make a homemade version with a straw and an empty soda or beer bottle; set the cherry on the lip of the bottle and shove the straw into the center – the pit will fall in the jar.

This recipe uses added citrus pectin to minimize cooking time and create a good set. You may prefer to omit the pectin and cook the jam for longer till it congeals. A longer cooking time will produce a jam with a more caramelized flavor.

I highly recommend that you drink a Manhattan or two while making this jam.
Produces about four 8-ounce jars or two pint jars

INGREDIENTS
2 pounds cherries, halved and pitted (about 5 cups)
2 ¾ cups sugar
¼ cup rye whiskey
2 tablespoons sweet vermouth
4 dashes of angostura bitters (or use Hella Bitters, my personal fave)
3 tablespoons orange juice
zest of 1 orange

FOR THE GELLING
This recipe uses Pomona’s Pectin, an all natural citrus pectin that’s vegan, gluten free and flavorless — you can find it at many natural grocery stores like Whole Foods and online
3 teaspoons calcium water
2 teaspoons pectin

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

1 cherry pitter, snocciolatore (Italian cherry/olive pitter), or straw & a bottle

PREP 
For the cherries:

Rinse the cherries in cold water. Using a cherry pitter or snocciolatore, remove all pits from the cherries.

Place the cherries, whiskey, vermouth, orange juice & zest, and bitters in a 6-to-8 quart nonreactive pot and add 3 teaspoons calcium water from jar into pan; stir well.

For the jars and lids:

Wash and rinse jars; put them into a big stockpot; cover jars with water and bring to a boil; boil covered for 10 minutes to sanitize. Let stand in hot water until ready to fill.

Bring lids and rings to boil; turn off heat; let stand in hot water until ready to screw onto the jars.

For the sugar and pectin:

Measure sugar into separate bowl or measuring cup and thoroughly mix proper amount of pectin powder into sugar — using a fork helps to disperse the pectin into the sugar. Set sugar mixture aside.

Place two metal spoons in the freezer. This will be for testing the set of your preserves later on.

COOK

Bring the cherry mixture to a boil and continue cooking in high heat for 5 minutes. Skim and continue cooking on high heat, stirring frequently to avoid scorching.

Pour the mixed pectin-sugar into the boiling jam slowly and carefully, stirring as you add. Stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve pectin.

Return to boil and remove from heat. Skim off any and all foam that has formed at the top.

Pectin gels completely when thoroughly cool; so don’t worry if your jam looks loose when still hot. To test, place a teaspoon of the hot jam onto one of the frozen spoons you prepped; let it cool to room temperature (about 30 seconds) on the spoon. If it thickens up to the consistency that you like, then the jam is ready. If not, mix in a little more pectin (½ teaspoon into ¼ cup sugar) and bring it to a boil again for 1 minute.

PRESERVE

Fill jars to 1/4″ of top — using a wide-mouth funnel and a ladle to fill the jars helps avoid a big mess.

Wipe rims clean with a damp paper towel. Screw on lids (Ball jar 2-peice lids are easiest to use).

Put filled jars in water; make sure they’re thoroughly covered with 1 inch of water over the top of the lids. Boil for 6 minutes (add 1 minute more for every 1,000 ft. above sea level).

Lift the jars out of the water with your jar lifter or tongs and let them cool without touching or bumping them in a draft-free place. You can then remove the rings if you like. Once the jars are cool (at least 4 hours), you can check that they’ve sealed pressing gently in the center of the lid with your finger. If it pops up and down, it’s not sealed. If it’s firm and doesn’t move, then it’s sealed. If any of your jars have a faulty seal, don’t panic, just put the jar in the refrigerator right away and you can still use it – breakfast tomorrow!

Once cooled, store them in a dark place like a cupboard or closet. They last up to 12 months. After about 8 months, they may darken in color and start to separate or become less gelled. Preserves will last four to eight months once open and refrigerated.

Pairs well with soft cheese such as Bonne Bouche, Camembert and Bucheron; great on pizza with barbecued pork and Manchego cheese; delicious on top of yogurt and ice cream.

Anarchy in an Egg

Back when the company was in its infancy, Laena would moonlight in food competitions, using jam as an ingredient in everything from risotto to grilled cheese.

At this point, only a worthy benefit gets her back in the ring. The Anarchy in a Jar crew will be making deviled eggs at a fundraiser for Just Food’s City Chicken Project, which provides training, coops, and hens for school and community gardening groups, assisting them in raising healthy chickens and tasty eggs. Tickets can be purchased here or by making a donation of at least $25 to the City Chicken Campaign.

It will be fun.

What are we making? “The Umami Shiso Cracked” deviled egg uses Anarchy’s Umami Shiso Fine Mustard + magic aioli + Laena’s crazy secret “umami in a jar” powder that she invented.

Come get your deviled eggs on. Plus there’s free beer.

Monday, July 14th
Brooklyn Brewery | 79 N. 11th St; Brooklyn
7:30pm – 10:30pm

Note: This event is 21+. Guests under 21 need to be accompanied by a legal guardian.

kegs n kluckers

Jammin’ Video with Girl Gift Gather

Laena had a super fun time jammin‘ with the ladies of Girl Gift Gather, a rad project you have to check out!

 

NEW Stinky Bklyn in Chelsea

The infamous team at Stinky Bklyn (and Jakewalk &  Vine) has opened a sweet new cheese shop and wine store in Chelsea! And they’ve got the jams.

New Stinky Bklyn in Manhattan

 

Get Your Beer on at Food 52

It’s beer time on the awesome website and online food mecca, Food 52. Our Beer Mustard and Beer Jelly are part of the fun party, check it out!

Beer Mustard & Jelly